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Using Revoice Pro on John Wick 3 with Re-Recording Mixer Andy Koyama


Canadian Re-Recording Mixer Andy Koyama has come a long way from unpaid studio intern to an Oscar nomination for his work on the movie Lone Survivor. In a career spanning over 25 years, Andy has worked on a huge collection of critically acclaimed films including Nightcrawler, Selma, Iron Man 3 and About a Boy. 

After hearing the exciting news that Andy used Revoice Pro 4 on the recent blockbuster hit John Wick 3 - Parabellum, we got in touch to get the full story...

How did you start your career as a re-recording mixer?

I was an unpaid intern at a music studio where I learned the basics of tape machine alignment and studio setup.  I learned of a job at a post production facility on the same street and was hired because I knew their 24 track machines.  Worked my way up from that entry level position.

You started out working mostly on TV and subsequently switched to film, can you tell us a little about the differences between working with those formats?

From my perspective, although this is not always the case, we tend to have more time to refine our work in the feature world.  For me it is much more fun.

One of your most recent gigs was working on John Wick Chapter 3 Parabellum, can you explain how using Synchro Arts software helped you get the job done?

I used Revoice Pro a couple of times to refine the sync of ADR lines.  One character was revoiced and the original production had not been heard since very early in the picture edit.  I had them dig up the original production and tweaked the sync with Revoice Pro.  Worked a charm!

What do you feel is unique about Synchro Arts software?

Revoice Pro does this job better than any software I am aware of.  It can gearbox the sync extremely accurately with almost no artefacts.

You've worked on a huge number of movies over the years, do you have a favourite and why?

Most recently my favorite movies to mix have been the John Wick series.  The film makers are very enthusiastic about sound and leave us free to express ourselves.

Given your epic career now spans over 25 years, can you give us some insight on how the job of a re-recording mixer has changed over that time?

Unfortunately as time has passed in our world, budgets and schedules have shrunk due to many factors.  Now we must maximize our efficiency and develop new techniques to accomplish our goals with fewer resources.

What advice would you give to aspiring re-recording mixers?

My advice for aspiring re-recording mixers would be to first learn Pro Tools inside and out, then go out and find projects to mix as much as possible.  The best way to learn is to do.

Many thanks for answering those questions for us! Follow these links to learn more about Andy and his work - 

Andy Koyama on IMDb


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